PC SEARCH
SEARCH FOR A PC BY NAME
SEARCH FOR A PC BY COMPANY
SEARCH FOR A PC BY YEAR
COMPUTER OF THE WEEK:
Eagle IIe
Eagle IIe
VIEW DETAILS
SIGN OUR GUESTBOOK
"Mark Metzler wrote: I was in WalMart last night, and I swung by the Electronics area. I was curious as to how much a replacement drive would cost me for my PC at home, which has a 17gb drive in it. They had a 80gig drive sitting on the shelf next to the surge suppressors for $70. Never mind that it comes with the software to copy everything to the new drive. So I stood there trying to do the math on what it would cost to equate that volume of storage with ST506 drives at $1995.00 a pop. My head started hurting, so I rounded the ST506 to $2000. It would take 16,000 ST506ís to reach the memory of the drive in WalMart (again sitting on the shelf, not behind a locked cabinet). At $2000.00 a pop, it would cost me $32,000,000.00. Now that would have been a nice sale, but would have been stolen by Jim Scharffe or Mike Daniel. Here is another perspective. If stacked on top of one another, they would be as tall as a 667 story building. If from sea level, they would stack high enough to top the tallest building in Downtown Denver. If sold with a cabinet and power supply, Josef Rabinowitz would be retired. "

"Ohmigod! I'm reminded of when I worked for Heath Kline at Priority One Electronics in Chatsworth...and before that for Galaxy Computers in Woodland Hills when the Commodore 64 was introduced! We thought it huge compared to the Timex Sinclair...."

"We both have been into computers since 1970's & currently own 6 OSBORNE's in working condition. Although we use DOS now, we miss cpm & how actually FAST it was compared to Windows. We miss dBase. Append as well instead of Access now. We still have data on 5 1/4" discs we need to put into the dos machines we use now. Sorry to hear you are leaving the business - we certainly hope you find a buyer who will keep the collection intact! Best to you & your wonderful efforts!"


DONATE YOUR OLD
SYSTEM
WE ARE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR VINTAGE COMPUTER SYSTEMS
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO
THE FREEMAN PC MUSEUM

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST:
ENTER YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS
Dynalogic
Dynalogic
Dynalogic Hyperian
Dynalogic Hyperian

One of Canada's finest PC's. The Hyperion PC/XT-class computers were made at the same time that the IBM XT was just getting going. This computer is much smaller, lighter and more refined than the Compaq Portable or the IBM Portable. This one is fully loaded with 640Kb RAM, two floppies and a modem. It is also in excellent condition with no scratches or gouges. The built-in monitor is clear, bright and sharp. The memory and floppy drives work fine. These machines are fairly rare, even in Canada, because they were so expensive that only the government could afford to buy them new. This one is very rare because it is in such great shape, because BOTH floppy drives work (these drives are not easily replaced, they are a rare model) and because it has the built-in modem. Also comes with the original carry bag. Dynalogic was owned by BYTEC MANAGEMENT CORPORATION. The Hyperion was introduced in June 1982, but didn't start shipping until January 1983. Compaq introduced its Portable PC in November 1982, and started shipping units in March 1983. The Hyperion's keyboard slides in under the computer and locks into place automatically. The handle on the machine isn't a carrying handle like on Osbornes or Kaypro's, instead it is just like the handle on an old Macintosh. The disk drive doors on the Hyperion are fairly unique. The user pushes on the door to release the latch, and the door pops up.There is one strange 50-pin D-style connector on the back of the Hyperion as well, which according to Doug (Yowza) Salot, is for an external memory expansion. This port has also been used to connect external hard drive units to Hyperions. There are also three phone-jack style connectors on the back an internal 300 baud modem. Two of the three connectors will mate with a normal telephone extension cable, and these are the "phone" and "line" connections. The third is thinner, and houses four wires just as the other connectors do. Apparently it connects to an optional acoustic coupler. Hyperion was used by Commodore as the basis for Commodore's first generation of PC clones. According to George Robbins, ex-Commodore engineer: Commodore actually bought rights to the Hyperion design and there were a couple floating around West Chester. The design served as the basis for the first 8088 based PC-clones that Commodore manufactured, though they ended up in normal desktop cases. The next generation was basedmuch more directly on the IBM PC's (probably for 100% compatibility) then we started making our own customer chips/asic to get the cost down before switching to industry standard "chipsets" for 286-486 designs. In the end it was cheaper to just buy and resell clones from HK and Taiwan.On of my tasks at Commodore before the Amiga stuff took over was to make a comparison of the Hyperion design and our current PC design to "prove" that we weren't using any of the Hyperion proprietary design features and there was no reason we should continue paying them royalties on every PC we sold.

SPECIFICATIONS:
NAME   Dynalogic Hyperian
MANUFACTURER   Dynalogic
TYPE  
ORIGIN   Canada
YEAR   1983
LAST RUN 
QUANTITY BUILT 
OPERATING SYSTEM Custom PC-DOS 1.25H
CPU   8088
SPEED   4.77MHz
RAM   256-640Kb
ROM  
TEXT MODES   80 X 25 text
GRAPHIC MODES  
I/O PORTS   video, telephone, serial, parallel
POWER SUPPLY  
PRICE   $4995.00


COPYRIGHT (C) 2003. THE FREEMAN PC MUSEUM. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
INFO@THEPCMUSEUM.NET